Plastic-Free Shaving Saga

Who knew it was so complicated? All my life, or at least from puberty onwards, I’ve grabbed my razor with conviction and confidence. One day I finally decide to take the plunge into the world of safety razors (aka those badass metal contraptions people were using long before plastic came around) and a) it takes me almost a week to work up the courage to take it out of the box, plus b) when I finally sit myself down to figure it out, it scares the crap or of me. The f*ck?!

My panic at all of a sudden being confronted with something kind of deadly sent my brain spinning. All of a sudden the relatively mundane act of shaving was not mundane at all. It required me to pay attention, like really pay attention. It made me realize, again, that we’ve made yet another thing “convenient.” There is almost no thought to it, we simply pick up our handle and zip zip, done.

With this safety razor, it’s basically the same process, but slower. Literally if you rush the process, you’ll severely injure yourself. Not to mention, the whole thing is physically heavier than a disposable razor and a bit slippery given that it’s entirely metal, so getting a grip while showering requires patience. Get a grip, Ryan! 😜

But as we learn when we de-clutter and cut back on the plastic crap, we have to slow down. Just as we can’t just throw around a bunch of jars in our cars on the way to the store or else they’ll shatter, we also can’t rush through shaving anymore. And ya know what? I kind of like that.

To add to that, I’ve found that once we eliminate wasteful plastic from our lives, things get prettier. This razor is gorgeous, which is not something I ever would have said about my plastic razors. My Preserve handle was funky and pretty dang cool, to be sure, but this thing…wow. You’d think I’d have been bouncing off the walls with glee to have this hunky hunk of metal in my own bathroom, and I was! That is, until I realized that I had to deal with it and it wasn’t going to be as brainless as a disposable blade.

It took me 10 minutes of gingerly manipulating my new tool to finally load the blade and ensure it was nice and snug. Then another 10 minutes of attempting to actually do the thing. I know, “oh brother” right? I’m laughing at myself because it’s a bit ridiculous to write a whole blog post about shaving for Pete’s sake, but hey, I’m kind of proud, because this little thing forced me to take a pause, observe, and appreciate.

That is what I love about eliminating the crap from my life. I learn something new every time and it makes my brain feel good. I feel less robotic and really, shouldn’t we all be doing things we’re a bit uncomfortable with anyway?

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Revelations Over Juice

The intention of this post initially was simply to share how I turned a fridge full of produce into juice for a road trip. A couple of photos, a recipe, a hint at plastic-free choices, and done…except then I got more ideas as the road trip actually happened. So here we go:

I started with the above pile of produce and distilled it down into two juices: green and green. The watermelon was too big and there wasn’t much time to break it down, so it stayed as is and ended up coming along for the ride. Who doesn’t love road trip watermelon slices?! Put them in a cooler and off we went. Destination? Revelstoke, BC. More on that later.

Along the way, we stopped for lunch at a natural foods store in Vernon, BC. Nature’s Fare is a BC chain specializing in all things organic, natural, and holistic. They have aisles filled with supplements, household products, fresh food, and a spread of tasty deli items including fresh juice and smoothie options. On the surface, it’s a dream and really, it makes my heart sing to see people choosing this place over McDonald’s. But what got me more than a little POed was the disconnect between this healthy style of living…and all the packaging everywhere!

Places like Nature’s Fare are a beacon of hope for all people searching for healthy alternatives and yet, they sometimes fall so short in the packaging department. Want a muffin for the road? Great! But first, let me wrap that in a plastic bag because that’s what the health code requires of us. Want three? Individual bags for each, of course!

Guys, it’s enough to make me scream. Have we forgotten the point? I thought the goal was to eat and live more healthfully, and with intention…all while taking into account the things our stuff comes wrapped in (or not). Why are we still living as though our waste is inconsequential? We have to take into account the whole picture.

It seems like these days we’re becoming more like robots, and we need to break that mentality. Had we spoken up earlier at Nature’s Fare, we might have had a fighting chance at avoiding the plastic muffin bags altogether. And to be fair, the counter people are just doing their jobs; having worked in food retail, I get that. But when did we stop having conversations at the point of sale? Why aren’t we having a dialogue to inquire what customers truly want? We become sheep that way, and we are drowning in a sea of plastic-wrapped health food. That’s not healthy!

I feel like I’m knocking Nature’s Fare. But too much with this rant and I don’t mean to. My point is that sometimes it’s easier to just DIY, and skip the chaos of the grocery store packaging mayhem. There’s power and satisfaction in making something in my own kitchen and packaging it as I see fit. Hence, the juice I mentioned at the beginning of this post!

So, if you’d like to share in that satisfaction, here’s the recipe for the juice that kept me awake on the road and calmed me down after the Nature’s Fare debacle. I quadrupled it and ended up with 64oz of green bliss. πŸ™ŒπŸΌ

(Ok, so after a day it starts to look less vibrant, but it was still tasty!)

And hey, if juicing isn’t your thing and you’d rather have someone else make it for you, that’s cool too. Nature’s Fare does do fresh-pressed juice! But how about bringing your own glass/jar/container to the counter and skipping the lame plastic?

Just Do the Thing!

Do you ever get totally overwhelmed by all the beautiful content on the Internet these days? Scrolling through my Instagram feed is like riding a roller coaster of emotions: first, it’s inspiring, then it gets frustrating, and sometimes I have to turn off the damn phone and walk away because I have flung myself into a sea of misery and feel like I can’t even begin to compete with all the beautiful madness. I give up.

But then, I make a smoothie, pour it into a jar, and realize…it doesn’t have to be perfect. None of this has to be perfect, it just has to come to fruition (haha, fruit…smoothies…it’s funny, right?) and BE a thing. Our smoothies don’t have to have perfectly placed chia seeds and banana slices on top, and they don’t need to be in a vintage Mason jar. Nope. Today it’s a repurposed mayonnaise jar and tomorrow it’ll be an old salsa jar and whatever the type of jar, it’ll be beautiful, and more importantly…it’ll be damned tasty.


After all, the point is not to gain 100K likes on this photo. That’s never the point! The goal is to demonstrate that food can be delicious, sustainable, and easy. Make a smoothie! Grab a jar! Enjoy it!

My favorite yoga studio has a phrase on the wall at the front desk that simply says, “Begin Anywhere” and I always come back to that concept when social media gets overwhelming. By doing the thing (like making a smoothie and putting it in a mayo jar), we are taking control of the situation, and creating something amazing. That is totally satisfying (and sustainable). πŸ‘ŠπŸΌ

World Oceans Day: Celebrate the Small

There’s varying schools of thought on the effectiveness of “small acts.” I’m speaking specifically about small acts of conservation, and on World Ocean’s Day, I’d say that conversation is pretty relevant, wouldn’t you?

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I was listening to CBC radio the other day (for my US readers, this is the equivalent of NPR and it makes me so happy that it exists!) and on the showΒ (begin at the 25:00 mark!)Β was a man by the name of Dan Kraus, who is with The Nature Conservancy of Canada. The topic of conversation was small acts of conservation (say that 5x fast…) but what really got me thinking was when someone phoned in with a comment, arguing for a different perspective on small acts. His thought process went something like this: if the small-scale changes are not part of a larger, master plan, then are they really worth doing, or are we just wasting our time?

At first, I bristled. Why are people so hell-bent on writing off the little stuff?!

But then I thought some more…and came to realize that maybe this caller was kind of right. We need to frame our small actions within the context of something bigger, a larger purpose, a goal. Even if that goal is just to eliminate single-use plastics from our own house. Without a goal, Β it’s hard to rally people (in the case of this plastics goal, our families), hard to motivate ourselves (why bother?) and nearly impossible to effect change (back to the good ‘ole Ziploc!).

Here’s the deal: large acts take time. In our own houses, they take time. On the scale of city-wide change, national change, and global change…even longer. We need to work together to make big changes happen and we need big changes to keep the world from totally collapsing.

But what about the in-between time? Like physically, in between writing legislation, and lobbying for change, and meeting with corporate executives and politicians, and holding town-hall meetings with concerned citizens, and running our houses. We still need to eat, to fuel our bodies for all these activism and outreach activities. We still need to get to-and-from all of these meetings. On weekends when we want to take a break from all the advocating, we kick back at a bar with friends, where we may sip on a cold beverage or two (or three, depending on how the advocating went…).

All of these moments require some kind of decision. A decision about what to eat, what to wear, what mode of transportation to take…and how to do all of those things.. so yes, those small acts really DO matter because it’s not like we can just say our piece in a meeting about climate change, then walk out the door and jump into an Escalade while chomping down on a CAFO-raised steak. Well, yes, I suppose we could…but then what the heck was the point of meeting to talk about climate change in the first place?

By doing our small acts of conservation daily, we are walking out walk; speaking our truth; rebelling against the man in our own ways…and these make the bigger acts that much more robust. We need the small to get to the big.

So today, on World Ocean’s Day, I will be sipping my juice through my glass straw because #plasticsux but I will also be thinking up ways to get the “straw-free” movement to Kelowna (any Canadians want to join me?). Ultimately, if I’m the only one refusing a straw here, nothing will change. But if the whole city goes straw free (hey, a girl can dream!), now that would be quite a big change, don’t you think?

Wherever you are, regardless of if there is an ocean near you, go out and celebrate in whatever way you can. Celebrate water, celebrate abundance, celebrate your freedom to CHOOSE the best thing for you and this wonderful, blue planet we get to call home.

Grateful for these salty seas. ❀️

Recycle, Profit, Invest…Repeat!

This is the power of a bottle deposit:

Step 1: Collect & Sort

Bottles and cans, just clap your hands…
Step 2: Profit

Canadian currency sure is pretty!
Step 3: Invest (in your health!)

Fresh from the Kelowna Farmer’s Market!
The act of returning metal and glass for money is amazing (almost like magic), but it’s made all the more powerful when that handful of change is put right back into the local economy. In doing this, I’ve supported area farmers, while also feeding myself and my family. And, as a bonus, I’ve also invested in our future health by purchasing a few seedlings for the garden. All with money collected from metal and glass. πŸ‘ŠπŸΌ

How freaking cool is that?!

It’s the Little Things…

I spend a lot of time mulling over blog posts, that eventually get forgotten, stuck in the “draft posts” folder, accumulating dust and never seeing the light of day. But the beauty of a blog is that it can be anything: off-the-cuff musings and/or fully researched articles. I like a healthy combination of both and so, I have a new tactic: just write and publish the darned post, as it happens, even if the finished product isn’t perfect and beautiful.

That brings us to the point of this post. I find inspiration for this blog in the things others may find mundane or may typically overlook as something of a non-issue. Examples include:

  •  Food retail outlets using way too much plastic packaging (drives me absolutely mental while some may not even see the plastic as a problematic);
  • Coffee shops serving beverages in takeaway cups despite customers then sitting in the shop (what an absolute waste of resources!); and
  •  Recently, hotels and the way they accessorize their rooms.

It’s this last bullet I’d like to highlight. This past week, I’ve been traveling around BC with my better half, and we’ve stayed in a myriad of hotels, motels, and something called a “boutique hotel” (is “boutique” the new “in” word?). Given that we are both into the whole #plasticsux thing, we usually base our opinion of a place in part on what products the hotel leaves for guests. “What are they equipping the in-room coffee tray with?” and “What toiletries are provided in the bathroom?” are usually the first things we’re wondering as we step into the room.

Context: lately, I’ve become totally jaded by hotels that appear lovely on the surface, but then litter their rooms with plastic crap. I imagine a place that has nice beds, towels, and an excellent shower to also follow through on the little things but as it turns out, this is not always the case! Last summer, we checked in at The Best Western in Fernie, and were impressed with its outward appearance, but totally let down by the sheer amount of packaged stuff in the rooms. It made me want to vomit. 😑


So when you land in a space, do a walk around the room and find no plastic, it’s like the stars have aligned. This week, that happened at every single hotel (and so far, we’re up to 5, so that’s saying something!). The coolest part about this is that 4 out of the 5 places have been little motels, no chain affiliation, in the middle of nowhere.

Funky accommodations in Revelstoke!
Which begs the question: if a small, one-off place is able to provide ceramic coffee mugs and actual glass water glasses, and paper-wrapped soap without any of the other unnecessary plastic tubes of bad shampoo, why is it that a mammoth corporation like Best Western, is offering lame styrofoam cups and plastic-wrapped plastic cups (I still haven’t figured out what the f*ck is up with that) and passing it off as cost-saving measures?! Surely they don’t need to cut costs, what with the amount of traffic they see and their clientele.

Authenticity is ceramic and glass. ❀️
So to the small-town motels, still offering these little reminders that we are capable of drinking coffee out of a real mug without breaking it, I thank you. It is these little things that give me hope, and that make me want to come back, if only for the chance at holding on to a piece of something authentic.

And, if you find yourself in BC looking for a quiet, authentic place to rest your weary, adventure-filled body, here are some recommendations! πŸ˜‰

My Kind of Politics

Happy 2017 blogosphere! I’m back, I have a lot of thoughts about a lot of things, but in the interest of staying more committed to regularly updating this blog, I’ll keep this post sweet and simple.

I am not going to talk about the politics currently engulfing everyone’s news feeds and social media channels right now. We don’t need more of that and in fact I’d argue that we probably need less. Which is why, immediately following the posting of this little shpeal, I am putting on my hiking boots and going outside. It may be winter here in BC (oh right, small update readers: I moved to Canada and funnily enough, it had nothing to do with politics!) but the sun is shining and the bad news takes a backseat to Vitamin D absorption. πŸ™‚

The politics I will discuss here are the kind I can’t get enough of: plastic pollution legislation. It makes meΒ so happy to witness communities transform to protect their surroundings, to become more innovative, and to make positive changes even if the logistical challenges are very real and seemingly insurmountable. A few years ago while still living in Maine, I was involved with a local effort to place a fee on plastic bags and ban expanded polystyrene foam food packaging (read: dreaded styrofoam) and after a lot of hard work and testimonial, we won. Portland, Maine now charges 5-cents for each plastic bag used at retail locations and the first time I saw a sign alerting customers to that change, I almost started cheering in the supermarket.

So to read this morning that there is legislation being brought forward to BAN OUTRIGHT all polystyrene food packaging for the entire state of Maine gave meΒ hope. It was a nice realization that while there is a lot of crazy sh*t going on in the world right now,Β there’s also a lot of really awesome sh*t and now more than ever, we need to be talking about all that awesomeness. Kudos to Maine for taking this on, I am so excited to see it progress!!